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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)
are not going to t along with anyone, so why try to pacify them? england, the united states, get out of the united nations. i'm tired of hearing hate speeches from people from other countries condemning us. this is a united nations of hate. host: if you go to the united nations web site, it says -- what you think? caller: i think at the time it was probably a good thing, but i don't think they counted on the rise of communism from china and russia and on the muslims and i think the muslims are a big problem with the united nations right now and we should stop trying to pacify them. we have a wenow who seems to sit there and watched-- we have a president now who seems to sit there and watch it. all he has been doing is apologizing. they killed two of our soldiers in afghanistan and the apologized to them. when the embassy was attacked, it was the man who had the movie's iffault. these people hate us. host: here is this on twitter -- here's the washington post front page -- many remember last year when the palestinian leader's request for membership was denied, not something supported
that egypt receives from the united states and i'm sure libya receives money -- i don't know how much, but i'm sure it does. and the amount was greater because the imbass door from libya had help arab spring. i've never been supportive of the arab spring. i know the columnists and the "times" and elsewhere extol it. we're friends with people who i'm sure will turn time-out be hostile to us. it doesn't make any sense. why should anybody trust us in the future? i'm not talking about mubarak how we threw him under the bus. those were the background facts that caused me to react strongly. >> congressman, you are very much the beneficiary of a shift in jewish vote in your district of queens and brooklyn. do you think the events, the attacks will result in yet a further ongoing shift of jewish americans changing -- >> i do. and i think there's a little more to follow. the shift in the special election indicated the distrust of this administration. and it was clear we heard what he said. we heard what the administration say and people didn't believe it. and the message was sent loud and clear. and
that a third airplane flying over washington, d.c., very close to the building we are in, the united states capitol, went down the street less than a mile and crashed into the pentagon. and that was at 9:37 eastern time. then a fourth airplane, we remembered as flight 93, was flying toward washington, d.c., probably the capitol or the white house where some good right thinking folks took control of the plane from a high jacker an they were -- hi jacker and they were -- hijack er and they were crashed in a field. on september 11, 2001, this nation was attacked. 3,000 people were killed that day. it's interesting that the attackers decided to attack the world trade center because people from 90 nationalities were in the world trade center building. the south and the north. so it was more than an attack on america, it was an attack on the people of the world. freedom-loving people. people who believed in living life and liberty. the murder was done by 19 radicals who murdered in the name of religion. of the 3,000 people that were killed, 411 of them were emergency workers. 341 were members of
differently? where was george bush at the convention that he was the former president of the united states. he was the reason why the situation we are in today. they did not want him around. host: could that happen today? someone with equal tends background get this far in the nomination process? >> someone with his background would be treated differently. he would not have shock therapy necessarily. he would be treated with psychotropic drugs that are not available at that time. it is hard to say what the calculus would be. illnessgleton's mental is asked about specifically during the vetting porcess, it depends on a case by case basis. by paul lord two this order is different for different people. >> we will have to leave it there. we have been talking with joshua glasser, the author of a "the 18 day running mate." that is the book there on the screen. thank you for being on the washington journal. >> tomorrow barack christiansen, chief -- rob christiansen. davis and policy -- a professor from north carolina. democratic delegate ryan fowler. live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c- span. watch covera
was the united states of america and got was the great people of ohio. thank you so very much. thank you. -- and god bles the people of ohio. thank you so very much. thank you. ♪ [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> tomorrow, until biden speak in the campaign rally at the national railroad museum in wisconsin. our live wrote to the white house coverage begins at 4:10 p.m. eastern here on c-span. >> as c-span covers the republican and democratic party convention this year, here is what some viewers have had to say about candidates. >> i thought governor romney had to do two things attend in his speech -- explain why obama deserves not to be reelected and explain why he deserves to be elected. as well as giving some idea of the roots of his values. since this was an introduction to america at large. i think he largely did a good job. >> i thought the speech was a fairly good speech. it did reintroduce mitt romney to the american public. however, it did not change my mind. i will sti
generation face nothing comparable to that of lawmakers in the mid-19th mid-19th century as the united states was on the bring of breaking apart, and the book that we're about to hear about, america's great debate,tles the story of the compromise of 1850, which helped to resolve at least for a while, the conflict over how to bring the vast mexican territory into the united states. the reviewer who did this review for the washington post happened to be don graham, the chairman of the washington post company, who is a student of history. he called this book original in concept and stylish in execution. the compromise that mr. bordewich will tell us about resulted from some of the most creative legislating that the country has ever seen, although mr. bordewich will be quick to point out that the compromise was also deeply flawed. but it did prevent an earlier breakup of the union. this is also a story that includes a magnificent cast of characters. befitting the epic struggles that played out during the course of the great debate. this is the third work be fergus bordewich which explores how sla
things that is not a premarket industry in the united states because regardless of whether we have the information as to the optimus and effectiveness of a hospital or a physician problem -- or a physician, our health care provider networks that we are allowed to use are dictated by the insurance companies. a lot of the discussion about health care in the united states, people fail to discuss the role of the insurance companies and in network and out of network providers. i would like for you to comment on a world of our employers and large insurance companies play in directing where we get care. oftentimes, we are not allowed to get hair -- get care at, say, a university hospital or a teaching hospital regardless of our condition since solely because the out of pocket expenses will be way too high for a person to report getting the best care, even though it exists. guest: in my book and "and accountable," i share the reasons why it patient often decides to come to, particular hospital. their mother was treated there, the party was easy. if people are choosing a hospital based on t
to be the standard security in high risk consuls and embassies that the united states has around the world and that includes no low refile armored vehicles, the vehicles that have the tires that will continue to operate even if they're shot out. and other security measures were not there on the ground. general jack keane commented on the security that was missing here on fox. >> there's been a pattern of attacks all through the summer. so we have a pat he tern of specific aggressive attacks and finally, our consulate is attacked. now, that's a movement that's doing that and that is coordinated. i don't think any film, even 9/11 maybe the day they chose to do it because of its significance, but that's certainly people who are out of power, there are moderates in power in libya, they want it undermine that government and foreign powers assisting that government are the target. common sense will tell you that our security for that ambassador and that consulate was totally inadequate. and after we do that assessment and we're putting the proper security in place, rest assured whatever it looks
, but the president of the united states is not quite yet. this is urbandale, iowa. this is a big rally and this will be the president's seventh stop in iowa leading up to presidential election this november. all of this as he kicks off the warm-up act before the dnc gets under way this week in charlotte. we'll take you back to urbandale, iowa, as soon as the president arrives. >>> all right. a check of some of the news happening right now overseas. in central afghanistan two suicide bombers have targeted an afghan military base. the attacks killed 13 people, among the dead, a child, two women and four policemen. the taliban has claimed responsibility. >>> in south africa, protests are breaking out over the arrest of 270 platinum mine workers charged with the murder of 34 of their colleagues, but those workers were actually shot by police. south africa's justice minister is now demanding answers. >> after 50 years, the german inventor of the drug thalidomide has apologized to its victims. the drug taken by pregnant women caused babies to be born with deformed limbs. the head of a surviv
demonstrated a willingness to tackle long- term debt problem of the united states. i think he is prepared to do that and prepared to push through a plan if we make some amount of progress in this election, but i assume he will be a great second-term president. >> i agree with melody, i think the election will be very close, but i believe the president will be reelected, because i do not think this country wants to go back to the policies being advocated by the mitt romney/paul ryan ticket to a place where we're talking about reducing taxes on middle income people. a place where we're reducing regulation in a way that opens us up to the same abuses that got us into the financial crisis that led to the recession we are still climbing out of. i do not think women want to go back to a place where health care choices is something that is problematic. where our environment is at risk, because we do not have an energy policy that recognize the needs for clean, alternative sources of energy. i do not think the country wants to go back to that place. i do a thing when the president reelected, one of the
in the united states senate where i've worked with many republicans to do important things like cutting spending, putting a cap on federal spending, like banning earmarks, like cutting taxes, over a trillion dollars for small businesses and working families. cleaning up war contracting and protecting and promoting american jobs. todd has worked closely with michele bachmann, and together them and a few others have really pushed things that would really harm missouri families. on march 8th of 2011, todd akin said i don't like social security, i think it's a bad investment. he's gone on in this campaign to delineate what is the triple whammy to social security. not only does he not like it, he would privatize it, put it on the roller coaster of wall street. he would raise the retirement age, and he would lower the benefit. on august 18th of 2011, he said medicare was unconstitutional. and since that time he has, in fact, voted several times to voucherrize medicare, to turn seniors over to private insurance companies, to arm wrestle with them for coverage and whether their claims will be paid and m
or iran or turkey invoking the greatness of their own power and impact and the united states tends to be more future oriented but in this particular case you found that the trauma of the hostage crisis and in the iranian revolution is still very formative and the - of americans who are responsible for the iran policy. >> guest: it is. ambassador ryan crocker told me one time in an interview that they are the most historical were the least historical society. and in this case i think there's still certainly every time they have a negotiation including the most recent one in moscow during the whole litany of grievances, so it is always on their mind. whether the u.s. policy makers realize it or not, the are too. the first years after the revolution clearly the hostage issue was for most american policy makers mind. if the iran contra happens that causes the relationship with the next prior risk and we saw it happen to ronald reagan and over a series of instances where they have spurred u.s. efforts to the rapprochement. there's a great example like to give just on this idea of the mo
willing, to the united states congress. [cheers and applause] my family's story isn't special. but special is the america that makes our story possible. ours is a nation like no other, a place for great journeys to be made in a single generation no matter who you are or where you come from the path is always forward. america didn't become the land of opportunity by accident. my grandmother's generation and generations before always saw beyond the horizons of their own lives and their own circumstances. they believed that opportunity created today would lead to prosperity tomorrow. that's the country they envisioned and that's the country they helped build. the roads and bridges they built, the schools and universities they created, the rights they fought for and won. these opened the doors to a decent job, a secure retirement, the chance for your children to do better than you did. and that's the middle class, the engine of our economic growth. with hard work, everybody ought to be able to get there and with hard work everybody ought to be able to stay there. and go beyond. the dream of ra
of the death penalty in the united states. we will speak with his sister kimberly davis, ben jealous, and laura moye. as italy upholds the convictions of 23 cia agents for kidnapping an egyptian cleric off the streets of milan, we will look at why the obama administration has refused to prosecute anyone involved in the u.s. government secrets torture and rendition program. we will speak with alfred mccoy here in madison. he is author of "torture and impunity." >> there is an absolute ban on torture for a very good reason. torture taps into the deepest recesses of the human consciousness where creation and destruction exist. with a capacity for cruelty and kindness to exist. it has a powerful, perverse appeal. and once it starts, but the perpetrators and the powerful who order them, let it spread. it spreads out of control. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. road in the madison, wisconsin. and this one person has been killed in pakistan as protesters fill the streets across several cities in what is expected t
to host this debate. my name a jonathan dine and i'm a libertarian candidate for the united states senate. like many of you, i'm tired of the constant fighting of the republicans and democrats. beating the other team has become more important. america is now on the verge of a financial collapse and both parties are to blame with their wreckless tax, borrow and spend policies. neither party seriously about balancing the budget or lowering your taxes or restoring your personal freedom. for as long as i can remember, republican and democrat politicians offering up solutions. higher and higher taxes. enough is enough. as a libertarian senator, i will stand up for your personal freedom, i'm socially accepting and tolerance. i'm also fiscalally responsible. i'm tired of the wreckless spending and the wreckless earmarks as your senator, i will vote no to wreckless spending, vote no to any legislation where spending exceeds revenue. i will advocate on the part of the balanced budget amendment. the government should live within its means just like the people of missouri. supporting my candidacy m
've been talking this week about red lines that he doesn't want iran to cross before the united states would be involved in military action. i think he's going to lay out what his red lines are and to say to the world, listen, this is a crisis that the whole world has to deal with. i think this is seen as his final warning that if we done see movement on this issue, israel will have to act. >> i want to talk about the iranian president. i'll let you first eat a little crow. you made a prediction that was wrong. >> i thought -- i said yesterday on this show that i thought ahmadinejad would kind of go for broke, kamikaze in his last u.n. general assembly. instead, he talked about, you know, this new world order that he sees when the world powers would have less influence. but he wasn't as fiery. he didn't mention israel by name. i think a lot of people were surprised. in the statements he was saying leading up to this appearance he was much more fiery. i think in addition to ban ki-moon, the u.n. secretary general asking him to tone it down, i think maybe the supreme leader in iran said
is not a challenge that can be contained. it will threaten the elimination of israel. the united states will do what we must to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. >> reporter: after his remarks, he crossed town to the clinton global initiative where he addressed an issue with potential appeal to evangelical and women voters, human sex trafficking. >> that's slavery. it is barbaric and it is evil and it has no place in a civilized world. >> reporter: wolf, on other top foreign policy concerns, he addressed the crisis in syria, he mentioned the withdrawal of troops from iraq and the draw down from afghanistan and the trouble between israel and the palestinians. but that was all. he essentially was checking the box on all those fronts. and no mention at all of china. in essence, wolf, this was a speech about the two crises that have consumed foreign policy discussion during the u.s. campaign. the tension between israel and iran and now this most recent crisis in libya, wolf. >> with six weeks to go until the election, jessica, tomorrow i take it he's right back out there in the swing states
announcing in the quietest most resurgent way possible that i'm grateful to live in the united states of america. that's all. gratitude for the sacrifices of my forebears. gratitude for the opportunity this country a force. gratitude for the men and women who served to fight in the military probably. gratitude for being a part of this amazing, ennobling experience representative democracy. blood, liberals hate the americans event is just okay. not good, not great. serving unexceptional. just okay. conservative women, mouthy ladies. to see some truly a lover i want, in your next conversation with a liberal, i was thinking about something sarah palin said the other day. stanback. led to the huffing and puffing and sighing and moaning begin to get as much as you finish the set by the way. you could say sarah palin likes chocolate ice cream or sarah palin thanks panda bears are cuddly. the result is going to be a kind of deranged automatic rejection of anything sarah palin says or thinks. try with ann coulter. same reaction. actually try with any well-known female who is unapologetically
or five members of the united states congress that voted to eliminate the child nutrition program. the vote was something like 416- 5. i do not think that is the mainstream compromise, willing to fix problems attitude that we need to send to washington. all that will do is contribute to more gridlock. it is not what he said that was the problem, it is what he believes. like many of you, i found the comments insulting to the victims of rape, insinuating their crime was not in some sense legitimate. i believe it shows career politicians have grown to secluded in washington and has forgotten what life is like outside of politics. i was astonished to find he sits on the science committee, yet failed to understand is the eighth grade biology. what i think it does is illustrates the point that we have 530 by people who were to regulate everything, but produce nothing. we really need to step back and understand his views should not be regulated by the government. he speaks for smaller government, yet he wants to push government morality on other individuals because they choose a differen
. the united states is more popular in libya than any country in the arab world, but they need help. after it was over, did we give them the assistance they needed? no. their borders are poor. laid is coming in. they don't have a strong government. they have a people that like the united states of america. in afghanistan we are having americans killed by "insiders." >> the troops that we're training. >> yeah. >> forces we are training in uniform. they just inflicked the greatest damage back on kandahar since the tet offensive. they blew up irreplaceable aircraft, and it's because the president has consistently overruled the recommendations of his military advisors. the chickens are coming home to roost, and the president won't even talk about it. >> let me ask you two quick questions. one of them i just want to say cnn did not put out the ambassador's diary. we did a report off of it. i want to make that clear to our viewers. >> by the way, i don't have a problem with that. the reason why the administration objected so vigorously because what was in what cnn reported. since when are we not
to be in the united states senate, given some of his views. but it is possible, as jim vandehei said, it's possible he could win this race. and it's clear tt a lot of republicans and the republican establishment now looking at the mathrehinking aut cg backin tnk the republican senatorial committee is very likely to put money into this race. i think the polls will tighten. as horrific as it will be to many people not just on the left but in the middle of the electorate, i think there's a reasonable chance he could win this race. >> not oy do igree with roy blunt did., e, at he is moving up in leadership, and he came out and supported akin yesterday. so that is -- >> the senator from michigan. >> yeah, that's the leading indicator. that tells you that the republican committee is going to go full in, and they see this as their way to rn nt a itllutegng control. and i can tell you that some of the very people now supporting him are republicans who tell me that working with him in the house has been horrible, that they jt think he's a nightmare, but they thk that he could be the solution to winning the sen
and describe why i think i'm the person that will become the next president of the united states and how my policies will make life better for american families. >> reporter: romney has had trouble getting that message across. the obama campaign is far outspending him in advertising and swing states and the media conservatives say is bias against them and in our interview romney declined to take what would be an easy shot. >> do you think the mainstream media is in the tank for president obama? >> we have free press and they're able to provide their perspectives based on their beliefs. there are people more on my camp and a lot of people more on his camp and i don't worry about that. >> reporter: campaigning wednesday in ohio, president obama had no trouble being critical of his opponent and evening converting a verbal misstep to an attack on romney. >> i want to see us export more jobs -- export more products, excuse me. i was i was channeling my opponent there for a second. >> reporter: now the president is out with another new ad today and it looks almost like he's trying to one-up romne
weather only to find out that the united states senate under democrat control will not even bring a budget plan to the senate floor. people should know the republican led house on the other hand, met its obligations, most significantly, it passed a budget to rescue america from debt crisis. >> alabama senator jeff sessions there. we have each side blaming the other. who do you think really gets the blame here? sn>> he's right the republicans accomplished their objectives because their objective is to rob obama of re-election, like that's what they said their objective is, the stated goal. maybe they haven't quite achieved that stated goal but in terms of what they're trying to do, they've gotten closer than the democrats for sure. the democrats have not been able to do anything because the republicans said that's their goal. it's hard to say staying in session any longer would improve things. this is a horrible meal. do you want seconds? there's one way to look at it, no way congress could get more unpopular. they'd have to spread diseases and kick babies to get more unpopular. i'm sure th
is the republican nominee for the united states senate in wisconsin. tommy thompson right now is losing that race. the last five polls out of wisconsin all show tommy thompson losing, including one poll out today that shows him losing by 12 points. and that was before the "milwaukee journal sentinel" today posts this video of tommy thompson this summer telling a tea party group what his plans are for medicare and also for medicaid. listen to this. >> change medicare and medicaid like i did welfare, and who better than me, that's already finished one of the entitlement programs, to come up with programs to do away with medicaid and medicare? >> who better than me, to do away with medicare? we're going to have to wait until the next round of polling in wisconsin to see how the tape of tommy thompson saying he wants to get rid of medicare affects his numbers, in a state that's already inclined against him by 12 points. what do you think the next round's going to look like. mr. thompson's democratic opponent in this senate race is named tammy baldwin. one snapshot of politics right now in this countr
to the united states, rather than remain in france with her ex. we'll talk to her in an exclusive interview in a moment. first, the latest from tanya rivero. >> reporter: actress kelly rutherford back to work in new york, on the set of "gossip girl." after the devastating custody ruling, keeping her children away. on the show, she plays a posh and polished mom, that rarely loses her cool. but behind the scenes, the three-year fight with her ex-husband, daniel giersch, over custody of their two children, ages 3 and 5, is reportedly crushing her. on tuesday, a judge ordered the children remain in france with their father, who they've been visiting over the summer. friday, rutherford asked the judge for a stay, which would have brought the kids back to new york while she appeals. but the stay was denied, destroying her last hope of getting the children back before school. giersch is a european citizen, who can no longer enter the u.s. since his visa was revoked. the judge ruled in order to maintain a 50/50 care taking split, the children must stay in france with him and rutherford travel back
by how scared the president of the united states looked, how disoriented he looked, how it seemed like they did not know where they were going. and i just want to do a hat tip right here, which, again, in this environment you probably aren't supposed to do. you know what? while george bush looked scared and disoriented that day, that day only, rudy giuliani stepped up. and he became america's mayor on that day. and he kept people advised of what was going on and was a great leader for that time. >> it was one of the great acts of spiritual and popular leadership that we'll ever see. and, you know, mayor giuliani is a big churchillian. but he was reading and looking at in those days and weeks a book by john lucash called "five days of may" in may of 1940 between churchill and chamberlain and halifax. and it was a marvelous case of leadership of being there. >> well, and like churchill and we're not comparing him to churchill, but for that time, though, like churchill, part of it was leadership, part of it was a great act. telling people, and by the way, that's what kept the british peop
and bring it back to the united states of america. we need a big bridge near washington, missouri. we need more highways and missouri. we need dam projects on the missouri river. i disagree with that. >> the center mention something about your position on competitive contracts. did you want to respond? >> i believe competitive bidding is a good thing. what you have going in iraq is pretty interesting. you had people who were terrorists. anything anybody did, they would load up or shoot anybody associated with it. -- they would blow it up or shoot anybody associated with it. the attacks on the idea of roads in afghanistan, the big economy and afghanistan is heroin. her win, you can put on a motorcycle -- heroin, you can put on a motorcycle and take somewhere. i have a kid serving in afghanistan. i he a kid almost killed in iraq. i understand the cost of what we are doing. i want to do it in the right way. >> did you want an additional 45 seconds? >>here was nothing about the contract and in iraq that did that require a competitive luck. there was nothing about that contracting. they finally
of the united states of america. last week the other party gave their sales pitch at their convention down in florida. >> boo! >> do not boo. vote. [applause] i have to say, it was something to see. despite all the challenges we face in this new century, we saw three straight days with an agenda out of last century. it was a rerun. you might as well have watched it on black-and-white tv with some rabbit ears. it should have been on nick at nite. if you did not dvr it, let me give you a basic recap of what they said. good the economy is bad. fault, andobama's hal governor romney has the secret to creating jobs and growing the economy. that is the basic summary. they spent the most time on me. they were talking about me, and there was a lot of hard truths and choices they said, but nobody bothered to tell you what they were, and when governor romney had his chance to let you in on the secret sauce of job creation, he did not offer you a single new idea. it was a retread of the same policies that have been sticking it to the middle class four years, and after the convention governor romney ca
, at age 5 or 6, there was revolution and they came back to the united states. and my dad had to get help, financial help. the government helped his family to be able to get on their feet again. by the way, that's the way america works. we have big hearts. we care for people who have needs. we help get them back, we help lift them up. but then we don't make that a permanent lifestyle. we don't have that become government dependence. we help people, we get them on their feet. >> mitt romney speaking just moments ago at univision's meet the candidate event at the university of miami. somewhat changing his language on immigration reform, talking about his dad as an immigrant from mexico. also defending his january remarks at another point in his speech that he was in favor of self-deportation. a video emerged the today on the campaign trail from when governor romney's father, george romney, was running for governor in the state of michigan. his wife, lenoir, talking to an interviewer about how, in fact, george romney had received welfare relief for a few years when first coming to this count
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)